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Corporate Video  +  Video Production  +  DVD Authoring and Design  +  Video Installation


JARGON BUSTER


Shooting script

Details each scene and shot and
any narrative or dialogue.

Storyboard

Visual representation of the
shooting script. Bit like a cartoon.

Recce

Researching locations to match
the scenes in the script.

Casting

Selecting actors or models. Can be done entirely 'electronically' or in a live casting session. Sometimes specialist casting agents are employed.

DV, HDV, DVC PRO, HD

Different standards or formats of video.


35mm  / 16 mm

The two principal film formats.


Call Sheet

A detailed guide to a shooting day or days. Lists all people involved with contact numbers, all locations and equipment.

D.O.P

The Director of Photography. An experienced lighting cameraman who will give the video its 'look' - sometimes also the operator.

Camera Operator

As it says on the tin.



UNDERSTANDING VIDEO PRODUCTION

Every business has its own mystique and video production is no exception.

Let's assume you and a chosen production company have agreed your brief and are clear about the objectives.

Two things are then immediately necessary (1) A clear conceptual treatment from the director who will be shooting your video and (2) A timetable for achieving it

The concept is everything. It's what turns your brief into something which, hopefully, people will want to watch. This can be an outline, a detailed shooting script, a storyboard - or all of these.

Ideally, it should be as clear as possible what the production company are trying to achieve for you. There should be room for creativity, but not for uncertainty.

When productions go wrong (and they occasionally do) it's usually because client and production companies have different ideas in their heads. So take time over this stage, it will pay you back.

Once agreed on this, the production company should produce a critical path detailing how the concept will be delivered. It should timetable every step in the process from scriptwriting to final delivery of your production in the format you agreed.

If the planning has been thorough, shooting should go smoothly. Of course, there can be unforeseen problems (weather, equipment failures etc - but they're surprisingly rare). Make sure you attend the shoot - and don't be afraid to speak up if you feel that it's deviating from what was agreed. It's too late (or expensive) to raise concerns once shooting has finished.

Once the video is shot, post-production begins. To begin with, all material has to be captured into a computer (digitising) for editing.

Then director and editor will select the best takes for every scene and produce a first edit. A music and guide voiceover, if applicable, will be added. This first edit is then submitted to you and your colleagues for comment. There may be shots you'd like deleted, words you'd like changed or scenes included that were dropped.

If planning has been good, if you have attended the shoot, there shouldn't be any unwelcome surprises.

After this, the production company will produce a final edit, incorporating any changes, adding any logos that may have been left out. Once you've signed off on this, they will process it to its final, intended format e.g. DVD, streaming video for the web - and so on.




JARGON BUSTER


Tracking shots

Camera moving in synch with live action so that the distance between camera and object remains constant e.g. tracking backwards as presenter walks to camera; tracking sideways to follow a car.

Jibbing shots

Shots where the camera moves up or down on the end of a jib to provide a dramatic change of viewpoint.


Digitising

Capturing what has been
shot into a computer.


Non-linear editing software

Incredibly flexible programs for arranging shots to create the finished film. Principal programs: Final Cut Pro (Mac only). Adobe Premiere pro (PC & Mac).


Voiceover

The addition of a professional
voiceover artist to.


SFX

Special effects: may be graphic overlays, clever use of text and a whole range of visual tricks.


DVD Authoring

The process of creating a DVD
with menus, sub-menus etc to allow flexible access to your whole video
or specific scenes.


Flash video

The most-used format for creating videos for use on a web page.

Corporate Video  +  Video Production  +  DVD Authoring and Design  +  Video Installation
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